IRAQ 3.0 A NEW COURSE IN UNDERWHELMING FORCE from Anonymous

God only knows what was going on in General William Westmoreland’s mind as he stared at the vast jungles of Vietnam.

 

(Published in our comments section on November 10, 2014 by Anonymous and approved for publication on SyrPer.  Real nice article)

 

Four Months Into Iraq War 3.0, the Cracks Are Showing

In or out, boots or not, whatever its own mistakes and follies, those who run the Pentagon and the U.S. military are already campaigning strategically to win at least one battle: when Iraq 3.0 collapses, as it most surely will, they will not be the ones hung out to dry

Karl von Clausewitz, the famed Prussian military thinker, is best known for his aphorism “War is the continuation of state policy by other means.” But what happens to a war in the absence of coherent state policy?

Actually, we now know. Washington’s Iraq War 3.0, Operation Inherent Resolve, is what happens. In its early stages, I asked sarcastically, “What could possibly go wrong?” As the mission enters its fourth month, the answer to that question is already grimly clear: just about everything. It may be time to ask, in all seriousness: What could possibly go right?

Knowing Right from Wrong

The latest American war was launched as a humanitarian mission. The goal of its first bombing runs was to save the Yazidis, a group few Americans had heard of until then, from genocide at the hands of the Islamic State (IS). Within weeks, however, a full-scale bombing campaign was underway against IS across Iraq and Syria with its own “coalition of the willing” and 1,600 U.S. military personnel on the ground. Slippery slope? It was Teflon-coated. Think of what transpired as several years of early Vietnam-era escalation compressed into a semester.

And in that time, what’s gone right? Short answer: Almost nothing. Squint really, really hard and maybe the “good news” is that IS has not yet taken control of much of the rest of Iraq and Syria, and that Baghdad hasn’t been lost. These possibilities, however, were unlikely even without U.S. intervention.

And there might just possibly be one “victory” on the horizon, though the outcome still remains unclear. Washington might “win” in the IS-besieged Kurdish town of Kobane, right on the Turkish border. If so, it will be a faux victory guaranteed to accomplish nothing of substance. After all, amid the bombing and the fighting, the town has nearly been destroyed. What comes to mind is a Vietnam War-era remark by an anonymous American officer about the bombed provincial capital of Ben Tre: “It became necessary to destroy the town to save it.”

More than 200,000 refugees have already fled Kobane, many with doubts that they will ever be able to return, given the devastation. The U.S. has gone to great pains to point out just how many IS fighters its air strikes have killed there. Exactly 464, according to a U.K.-based human rights group, a number so specific as to be suspect, but no matter. As history suggests, body counts in this kind of war mean little.

And that, folks, is the “good news.” Now, hold on, because here’s the bad news.

That Coalition

The U.S. Department of State lists 60 participants in the coalition of nations behind the U.S. efforts against the Islamic State. Many of those countries (Somalia, Iceland, Croatia, and Taiwan, among them) have never been heard from again outside the halls of Foggy Bottom. There is no evidence that America’s Arab “allies” like Saudi Arabia, Qatar, and the United Arab Emirates, whose funding had long-helped extreme Syrian rebel groups, including IS, and whose early participation in a handful of air strikes was trumpeted as a triumph, are still flying.

Absent the few nations that often make an appearance at America’s geopolitical parties (Canada, the Brits, the Aussies, and increasingly these days, the French), this international mess has quickly morphed into Washington’s mess. Worse yet, nations like Turkey that might actually have taken on an important role in defeating the Islamic State seem to be largely sitting this one out. Despite the way it’s being reported in the U.S., the new war in the Middle East looks, to most of the world, like another case of American unilateralism, which plays right into the radical Islamic narrative.

Iraqi Unity

The ultimate political solution to fighting the war in Iraq, a much-ballyhooed “inclusive” Iraqi government uniting Shias, Sunnis, and Kurds, has taken no time at all to fizzle out. Though Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi chose a Sunni to head the country’s Defense Ministry and direct a collapsed Iraqi army, his far more-telling choice was for Interior Minister. He picked Mohammed Ghabban, a little-known Shia politician who just happens to be allied with the Badr Organization.

Even if few in the U.S. remember the Badr folks, every Sunni in Iraq does. During the American occupation, the Badr militia ran notorious death squads, after infiltrating the same Interior Ministry they basically now head. The elevation of a Badr leader to—for Sunnis—perhaps the most significant cabinet position of all represents several nails in the coffin of Iraqi unity. It is also in line with the increasing influence of the Shia militias the Baghdad government has called on to defend the capital at a time when the Iraqi Army is incapable of doing the job.

Those militias have used the situation as an excuse to ramp up a campaign of atrocities against Sunnis whom they tag as “IS,” much as in Iraq War 2.0 most Sunnis killed were quickly labeled “al-Qaeda.” In addition, the Iraqi military has refused to stop shelling and carrying out air strikes on civilian Sunni areas despite a prime ministerial promise that they would do so. That makes al-Abadi look both ineffectual and disingenuous. An example? This week, Iraq renamed a town on the banks of the Euphrates River to reflect a triumph over IS. Jurf al-Sakhar, or “rocky bank,” became Jurf al-Nasr, or “victory bank.” However, the once-Sunni town is now emptied of its 80,000 residents, and building after building has been flattened by air strikes, bombings, and artillery fire coordinated by the Badr militia.

Meanwhile, Washington clings to the most deceptive trope of Iraq War 2.0: the claim that the Anbar Awakening—the U.S. military’s strategy to arm Sunni tribes and bring them into the new Iraq while chasing out al-Qaeda-in-Iraq (the “old” IS)—really worked on the ground. By now, this is a bedrock truth of American politics. The failure that followed was, of course, the fault of those darned Iraqis, specifically a Shia government in Baghdad that messed up all the good the U.S. military had done. Having deluded itself into believing this myth, Washington now hopes to recreate the Anbar Awakening and bring the same old Sunnis into the new, new Iraq while chasing out IS (the “new” al-Qaeda).

To convince yourself that this will work, you have to ignore the nature of the government in Baghdad and believe that Iraqi Sunnis have no memory of being abandoned by the U.S. the first time around. What comes to mind is one commentator’s view of the present war: if at first we don’t succeed, do the same thing harder, with better technology, and at greater expense.

Understanding that Sunnis may not be fooled twice by the same con, the State Department is now playing up the idea of creating a whole new military force, a Sunni “national guard.” Think of this as the backup plan from hell. These units would, after all, be nothing more than renamed Sunni militias and would in no way be integrated into the Iraqi Army. Instead, they would remain in Sunni territory under the command of local leaders. So much for unity.

And therein lies another can’t-possibly-go-right aspect of U.S. strategy.

Strategic Incoherence

The forces in Iraq potentially aligned against the Islamic State include the Iraqi army, Shia militias, some Sunni tribal militias, the Kurdish peshmerga, and the Iranians. These groups are, at best, only in intermittent contact with each other, and often have no contact at all. Each has its own goals, in conflict with those of the other groups. And yet they represent coherence when compared to the mix of fighters in Syria, regularly as ready to slaughter each other as to attack the regime of Bashar al-Assad and/or IS.

Washington generally acts as if these various chaotically conflicting outfits can be coordinated across borders like so many chess pieces. President Obama, however, is no Dwight Eisenhower on D-Day at Normandy pointing the British to one objective, the Canadians to another, ultimately linking up with the French resistance en route to the liberation of Paris. For example, the Iranians and the Shia militias won’t even pretend to follow American orders, while domestic U.S. politics puts a crimp in any Obama administration attempts to coordinate with the Iranians. If you had to pick just one reason why, in the end, the U.S. will either have to withdraw from Iraq yet again, or cede the western part of the country to IS, or place many, many boots on the ground, you need look no further than the strategic incoherence of its various fractious “coalitions” in Iraq, Syria, and globally.

The Islamic State

Unlike the U.S., the Islamic State has a coherent strategy and it has the initiative. Its militants have successfully held and administered territory over time. When faced with air power they can’t counter, as at Iraq’s giant Mosul Dam in August, its fighters have, in classic insurgent fashion, retreated and regrouped. The movement is conducting a truly brutal and bloody hearts and minds-type campaign, massacring Sunnis who oppose them and Shias they capture. In one particularly horrific incident, IS killed over 300 Sunnis and threw their bodies down a well. It has also recently made significant advances toward the Kurdish capital, Erbil, reversing earlier gains by the peshmerga. IS leaders are effectively deploying their own version of air strikes—suicide bombers—into the heart of Baghdad and have already loosed the first mortars into the capital’s Green Zone, home of the Iraqi government and the American Embassy, to gnaw away at morale.

IS’s chief sources of funding, smuggled oil and ransom payments, remain reasonably secure, though the U.S. bombing campaign and a drop in global oil prices have noticeably cut into its oil revenues. The movement continues to recruit remarkably effectively both in and outside the Middle East. Every American attack, every escalatory act, every inflated statement about terrorist threats validates IS to its core radical Islamic audience.

Things are trending poorly in Syria as well. The Islamic State profits from the power vacuum created by the Assad regime’s long-term attempt to suppress a native Sunni “moderate” uprising. Al-Qaeda-linked fighters have just recently overrun key northern bastions previously controlled by U.S.-backed Syrian rebel groups and once again, as in Iraq, captured U.S. weapons have landed in the hands of extremists. Nothing has gone right for American hopes that moderate Syrian factions will provide significant aid in any imaginable future in the broader battle against IS.

Trouble on the Potomac

While American strategy may be lacking on the battlefield, it’s alive and well at the Pentagon. A report in the Daily Beast, quoting a generous spurt of leaks, has recently made it all too clear that the Pentagon brass “are getting fed up with the short leash the White House put them on.” Senior leaders criticize the war’s decision-making process, overseen by National Security Adviser Susan Rice, as “manic and obsessed.” Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel wrote a quickly leaked memo to Rice warning that the president’s Syria strategy was already unraveling thanks to its fogginess about the nature of its opposition to Assad and because it has no “endgame.” Meanwhile, the military’s “intellectual” supporters are already beginning to talk—shades of Vietnam—about “Obama’s quagmire.”

Joint Chiefs Chairman General Martin Dempsey has twice made public statements revealing his dissatisfaction with White House policy. In September, he said it would take 12,000 to 15,000 ground troops to effectively go after the Islamic State. Last month, he suggested that American ground troops might, in the future, be necessary to fight IS. Those statements contrast sharply with Obama’s insistence that there will never be U.S. combat troops in this war.

In another direct challenge, this time to the plan to create those Sunni National Guard units, Dempsey laid down his own conditions: no training and advising the tribes will begin until the Iraqi government agrees to arm the units themselves—an unlikely outcome. Meanwhile, despite the White House’s priority on training a new Syrian moderate force of 5,000 fighters, senior military leaders have yet to even select an officer to head up the vetting process that’s supposed to weed out less than moderate insurgents.

Taken as a whole, the military’s near-mutinous posture is eerily reminiscent of MacArthur’s refusal to submit to President Harry Truman’s political will during the Korean War. But don’t hold your breath for a Trumanesque dismissal of Dempsey any time soon. In the meantime, the Pentagon’s sights seem set on a fall guy, likely Susan Rice, who is particularly close to the president.

The Pentagon has laid down its cards and they are clear enough: the White House is mismanaging the war. And its message is even clearer: given the refusal to consider sending in those ground-touching boots, Operation Inherent Resolve will fail. And when that happens, don’t blame us; we warned you.

Never Again

The U.S. military came out of the Vietnam War vowing one thing: when Washington went looking for someone to blame, it would never again be left holding the bag. According to a prominent school of historical thinking inside the Pentagon, the military successfully did what it was asked to do in Vietnam, only to find that a lack of global strategy and an over-abundance of micromanagement from America’s political leaders made it seem like the military had failed. This grew from wartime mythology into bedrock Pentagon strategic thinking and was reflected in both the Powell Doctrine and the Weinberger Doctrine. The short version of that thinking demands politicians make thoughtful decisions on when, where, and why the military needs to fight. When a fight is chosen, they should then allow the military to go all in with overwhelming force, win, and come home.  By, Anonymous

 

(Note: Our readers are encouraged to submit well-crafted and well-thought-out essays and studies on events in the Near East – especially Syria.  While we cannot guarantee each one will be highlighted like this essay, we can assure you that readers will be able to access the articles on our Comments Section. Ziad) 

 

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NEWS AND VIDEOS:

Dudley sends us this video of the captured rat, ‘Abdullah Al-Rifaa’iy, a FSA leader who was nabbed by the Lebanese at ‘Arsaal while dressed as a woman. We reported his arrest yesterday but failed to mention his Halloween outfit:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fDH0NLEAP1Q


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dudleydoright911
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Level 6 - Praefectus

Nice article but i would remark that the chief source of isis funding is gulf state patronage. They are selling a modesf amount of oil at as low as 20 bucks a barrel and all oil transport is “crude” in nature. I.e. by the tanker.

Remove the qatari / saudi / kuwaiti money and they are finished

Boiler Room
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Level 3 - Praetorian
Boiler Room

It is the money coming from the gulf monarchies and the shelter for the mecenaries including medical treatment and weapon supply through Jordan, Israel (Golan), Turkey (especially Hatay), and since recently Iraq.

Ozsceptic
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Level 7 - Tribunus Angusticlavius
Ozsceptic

Hi Dudley – By Anonymous? ‘Nice article’ but…….Unless our ‘anonymous’ IS actually Mr Peter Van Buren, this is just crude plagiarism.
Here’s the link: http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2014/11/peter-van-buren.html

Boiler Room
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Level 3 - Praetorian
Boiler Room

I would love to see the SAA in al-Atarib or Ad Dana!

david
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Level 5 - Tribunus Militum
david

the american plan to chase isis all the way damascus seems far fetched

Canthama
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Level 8 - Legatus Legionis
Canthama

Very article indeed. The “Strategic Incoherence” is particularly a precious piece, simple and to the point.

Milo
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Level 2 - Veteran
Milo

Check this out…who ISIS actually are….and why all of a sudden the Jew media decided to change it from ISIS to Isil……ISIS is a real mercenary company (I bet it is the CIA itself….killing for sale)

Anyway check out their website

https://public.isishq.com/public/about/default.aspx

Arklight
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Level 1 - Novice
Arklight

I thought the article was interesting, although it was written more as a means to put ink on paper than to be current and informative, bar the Captagon’s determination not to be the scapegoat when it all falls apart.

Canthama
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Level 8 - Legatus Legionis
Canthama

The world is lacking heros for a long time, very few nowadays indeed, but it is comforting to know that we have the SAA/NDF/Hizbullah heroes to mirror from. God bless Syria and the SAA.

Hannibal
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Level 3 - Praetorian
Hannibal
I am too lazy to comment, so I copied and pasted my comments from yesterday, with modifications : What you see as shortcomings of the US strategy in Iraq and Syria, is what I believe is intentional planning by the US. The USA, does not want to defeat IS. Why should the USA defeat IS? The usa simply wants to put limits on the actions and direction of the IS operations. The US actions are simply to draw red lines that the IS should not cross: red line around Irbil and US intersts in Kurdish areas. The IS have enabled… Read more »
Boiler Room
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Level 3 - Praetorian
Boiler Room

To some degree the influx of mercenaries trough Turkey to Syria could have been stopped if the USA wants to. But the real question is rather, why is Syria not able to close its boarders at least in the Idlib and Aleppo region for the enemy coming from Hatay/Turkey. It seems to me Ziad Fadel is avoiding an answer here for whatever reason I do not know. This indicates that there must be a political solution to the conflict and not just one by means of military force.

Arklight
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Level 1 - Novice
Arklight

Boiler: Look at the map, Boiler. There are a lot of bad guys between SAA and the border in the north. You can answer a lot of your own questions if you just pay attention.

Link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Template:Syrian_Civil_War_detailed_map

Canthama
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Level 8 - Legatus Legionis
Canthama

This is good news, a video on Central Homs gas fields and thermoelectric power plants working nicely after being re-liberated few days ago. Energy will flow to Damascus and Homs without problem.

Shinaydeen
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Level 4 - Scholae Palatinae
Shinaydeen

This is a very important victory, just as important as any military victory. When the SAA is in a position to restore full electricity and water supply services to Aleppo, that also will be a huge advance, the kind of defeat which the nihilists cannot deal with.

Anonymous
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Level 0 - Anonymous
Anonymous

The Syrian People support Bashar Al Assad and the Syrian Arab Army.

Newsguy
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Level 1 - Novice
Newsguy

It’s 11/11/2014 and the usmc didn’t storm Assad’s house. Maybe the year was wrong?
Would be nice to see this all over by Christmas and people move on to better things.

Why doesn’t Syria just build a wall around the border like Israel has done? Good fences make good neighbors…

Bob Birk
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Level 0 - Anonymous
Bob Birk
Down with Anonymous and his USA Imperialist Bullshit Apologetics, about Iraq and the bungling of the Vietnam War. Anonymous is a fraud! The USA has no coherent policy on Iraq because it is responsible for Destroying Iraq, it’s also responsible for creating, the fraudulent Zionist phony, Israeli Islamic state. Operation Eager Lion and Zionist fear and loathing! Is the casus belli of the Entire Middle Conflict! I declare the Iraq 3.0 Article an illegal fraud! And a weak attempt to explain away the wrongs of a wicked, Racist Anglo/Zionist American Foreign Policy! On Sandy Brown Skin People. In my opinion… Read more »
Dany the Fatso
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Dany the Fatso

Same here, Vietnam was a crime itself.

Shinaydeen
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Level 4 - Scholae Palatinae
Shinaydeen

This is just ranting. It is an understandable emotional reaction but it goes nowhere.

GCG
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Level 3 - Praetorian
GCG

Bob, I was thinking the same thing the whole time. I was wondering if the author was a former Syrian resident whose name will not be spoken and who was recently humiliated and discredited for his media whore exploits. I do feel the same about this article.

SharkKing71
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Level 3 - Praetorian

Some “Moderate Rebels” Supporters on Twitter claim that Obama is allied with Assad,Proof:(( https://twitter.com/SyriansRISE_UP/status/530552971055341568 )),Thank God that our Brain is safe from these stupid mongrels.

Shinaydeen
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Level 4 - Scholae Palatinae
Shinaydeen
“Some “Moderate Rebels” Supporters on Twitter claim that Obama is allied with Assad.” He isn’t but he should be. In time, he probably will be, in fact if not officially. , If US policy continues to evolve in the direction that it is going, they will realise, with the greatest reluctance, that it is in their best interests to pinch their noses and support Assad. I suspect that many key officials in the White and the Pentagon, as well as the CIA have already reached that conclusion. At the moment, it is most likely that there are certain unofficial, indirect… Read more »
SharkKing71
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Level 3 - Praetorian

True Story

the Thylacine
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Level 7 - Tribunus Angusticlavius
the Thylacine
I agree, as a critic of Anon’s Strategic Incoherence. Obama-Assad is go! Remember that various Yanqui factions are pursuing multiple strategies in Syria — it’s not a question of an overall aim. The Rogue Network represented by McCain via ISIS threatens the entire world with it, China and Russia included. ISIS are already threatening Putin himself, drawing a marvellous salvo from Chechen president Ramzan Kadyrov. Obama-ites are training more moderate cannibals to turn on Assad. But Obama’s enemies are strengthening and will try to embarrass, maybe even impeach him before 2016 rolls. His only remaining move, as he has done… Read more »
Dany the Fatso
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Dany the Fatso

They feel bretrayed since they expected that U.S would bombard the SAA. Now they are disappointed, since Syria is well defended by its air defenses and Foreign backing (IRAN -RUSIA). They crazy dreams are broken now. The next phase of the war should consist in the SAA destroying the remainding pockets of Green rebels in East Damascus and Idlib-Homs. The ISIS its begining to get bogged down at Kobane, Shaer, Deyr eir Sor.

SharkKing71
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Level 3 - Praetorian

The “Moderate Rebels” dreams is too much broken,There are Grey dots(Al Nusra Front) all over Idlib in the Wikipedia map instead of the former Green(Don’t get confused with the Black Dots which indicates areas under IS)

Map:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Template:Syrian_Civil_War_detailed_map

Khan Shaykun is also Grey,so that means…..”either leave Syria and head back to the dump you came from or Become a Fertilizer”

Dany the Fatso
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Level 3 - Praetorian
Dany the Fatso

Beware of Annonymous since any stupid in front of a PC can claim being Annonymous, even a CIA agent, beware! dont be fooled with nice worlds than simply downplay the evil plans of World Domination by a Anglo American Empire.

The Ghost of Colonel Gaddafi
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Level 6 - Praefectus
The Ghost of Colonel Gaddafi
Now ISIS wants to introduce its own currency: Plans to bring back solid gold and silver dinar coins announced in Iraqi mosques ISIS said to be planning to INTRODUCE its own CURRENCY to areas it controls Militants allegedly want to bring back the dinar – an ancient Islamic currency The original dinar currency consisted of purely gold and silver round coins http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2829097/Now-ISIS-wants-introduce-currency-Plans-bring-solid-gold-silver-dinar-coins-announced-Iraqi-mosques.html Truth about Rothschild vs Gaddafi… https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j45Jo4GSwfY 1: Gaddafi wouldn’t bow down to the Rothschild banking cartel. 2: Purposed African Satellite 3: AMF:African Monetary Fund – No Central Bank, own currency – Bank of Investment: To control most INVESTMENTS… Read more »
The Watcher
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The Watcher
To me Libya was a simple robbery. Now the idiots there have to pay interest to access the wealth “the mad dictator” has accumulated for them. Goldman Sachs stole a ton of money from the Libyan foreign wealth fond and the new “democratic leaders” are filling their pockets. I wonder why parts of the Libyan people let Gaddafi down but they will pay the price now too. Western central banks hate gold and silber. Funny as Gold and Silber will be used by ISIS. I good way to stamp all gold and silber bugs “medieval” idiots too now as the… Read more »
Arklight
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Level 1 - Novice
Arklight

Ghost: Good post. As far as I can tell, it’s accurate, with the note that Gaddafi was about to roll out the Libyan Gold Dinar, in June. In February word leaked out, the banksters got wind of the plan, and ‘So long, Libya.’

Nobilitatis
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Level 6 - Praefectus
Nobilitatis

That bring me to the question why Russia should buy oil. And I would comment that Ghaddafi spent a very big amount of his money to control the policy in certain European countries. With which he dealt in the gas and oil business. China and India are further away. There are gaps in this thought building. It sounds more like wishful thinking.

The Watcher
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Level 3 - Praetorian
The Watcher

Hi all,

i was just reading this Daily Beast article (posted on Peto Lucem):

http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2014/11/11/al-qaeda-s-killer-new-alliance-with-isis.html?via=desktop&source=twitter

The article sounds like a mix of hear say, lies mixed with some facts and some stand up commedy.

This section seems interesting:

“Hazm denies reports that jihad fighters managed to seize U.S.-supplied TOW anti-tank missiles, but concedes that al Nusra was able to secure 20 tanks, five of which were fully functional, six new armored personnel carriers recently supplied from overseas, ”

“six new armored personnel carriers recently supplied from overseas” Well what can one say….

cheers
J

Anonymous
Guest
Level 0 - Anonymous
Anonymous

A little gift from Germany for Israel (Israel want´s warships, and the german tax-payer have to pay for it):

http://www.spiegel.de/politik/deutschland/kriegsschiffe-deutschland-gewaehrt-israel-zuschuss-ueber-300-millionen-a-998406.html

Monsters Inc Friends of McCain
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Level 6 - Praefectus
Monsters Inc Friends of McCain

Former Isis Bodyguard: We Beheaded Children in Front of Parents

“Starting with a thirteen-year-old boy, they lined up the sons according to their height and beheaded them in that order,” said the bodyguard.

“Afterwards, they hung the boys’ heads on the door of the school the family had been hiding in.”

“It would take days to recount to you the violence I witnessed.”

http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/former-isis-bodyguard-reveals-horrific-secrets-terror-groups-leadership-1474296

US Marine Exposes Sen John McCain as a Traitor and for LYING about Syria

Read more at http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=63b_1414459946#J0u2Tttvtf2HpCfb.99

ziad and 'his foolish propoganda
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Level 1 - Novice
Hi Ziad the ape 🙂 Is it true that you always make up the story that the rebels are responsible for the civillian killings because they use the civilians as shields (you always call the rebels as rats so we can easily deduce the killed civilians (most of them are women children and old people ) are the relatives of the rats) I mean the killed civilians are rats too SO Glorious Syrian army can bombard the civilians too… By the way the apes don t you know that ISIS ıs the plan of the west for the next 50… Read more »
Alex
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Level 5 - Tribunus Militum
Alex

A great article. The entire article reads like a Greek Tragedy and projects the problem as an American military and political system covered with wet glue and unable to free itself. Looking back I like to blame George W. Bush for setting this disaster in motion in 2004 rather than Obama. Before Obama took office the first time you could see the mess he was left with..

inside syria
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david
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Level 5 - Tribunus Militum
david

the daily telegraph is a right wing source. cannot be depended on. they have a track record of lying. why do you use a source that is totally anti syria and pro israel?

Will the Real John McCain Please Stand Up? John McCain's right-wing madness
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Will the Real John McCain Please Stand Up? John McCain's right-wing madness
Inside the CIA’s Syrian Rebels Vetting Machine http://www.newsweek.com/moderate-rebels-please-raise-your-hands-283449 By Jeff Stein Filed: 11/10/14 at 8:00 PM Updated: 11/11/14 at 5:58 PM Nothing has come in for more mockery during the Obama administration’s halting steps into the Syrian civil war than its employment of “moderate” to describe the kind of rebels it is willing to back. In one of the more widely cited japes, The New Yorker’s resident humorist, Andy Borowitz, presented a “Moderate Syrian Application Form,” in which applicants were asked to describe themselves as either “A) Moderate, B) Very moderate, C) Crazy moderate or D) Other.” After Senator John… Read more »
inside syria
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Cadet Vadim Andreevich
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Level 6 - Praefectus
Cadet Vadim Andreevich

Novorossiyan Cadet Vadim Andreevich | English Subtitles

david
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Level 5 - Tribunus Militum
david

in ww1 the british used soldiers as young as 16. a few months away from 18 is considered a fighting age in most armies of the world

DoS
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Level 1 - Novice
DoS

Sounds to me like “anonymous” is trying to make a Pentagon’s case for an American overwhelming force involvement after arguing that Obama’s strategy is beginning to show cracks…that, the “short leash on the pentagon” should be enlarged to include troops on the ground all over Iraq and Suriya.

CHEVI789
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Level 7 - Tribunus Angusticlavius
Sorry but the article is nothing new, i can write one but it would take days to read because everything is inter wound, all in all it ends up basically stating the the zionist want world domination at all our costs, the masses are to great to control so start another world war to reduce it to a manageable size. The zionists have infiltrated many countries and taken over and have almost made many of us immune to the holocaust, mind you they did not live it but the ones who did are disgusted at their leaders for doing the… Read more »
Josh
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Level 1 - Novice

The supposed US war against ISIS has thus far been mostly a phony one. See: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BzmEjHuA8Ys

Nobilitatis
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Level 6 - Praefectus
Nobilitatis
The “aphorism” from Carl von Clausewitz is actually the conclusion of his definition of war from his book “about war”. The translation is bad. (I believe Ziad did not translate it by himself.) The German Quote is “Der Krieg ist eine bloße Fortsetzung der Politik mit anderen Mitteln.” (It is the headline of one chapter.) In German language the word Politik means policy and politics. It does not leave out means to get the intended aim. War is only one more tool for that. To know if the US fails it needs to be sure that the told objective is… Read more »
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